small girl. big city. cliches abound.

STL Native. NYU and Columbia Alum. Ain't nothing about this blog consistent. I like what I like.
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withoutwallsproject:

Photo Credit: arrestedmotion.com

Today I’ll be taking you guys back to the Meatpacking District inside the Standard Hotel. Now remember the last time we were here I introduced you guys to the KAWS sculpture in front of the hotel. The Standard Hotel has gained a bit of a reputation in the city. Not only as a destination for lodging but for nightlife as well. The recently opened Boom Boom Room has raised its profile for locals and visitors looking for a good time. Another section of the hotel, Le Bain, has people talking. This specific two-floor area of the hotel has a 4 foot hot tub (thus the name Le Bain) and half of the roof of the hotel where you can get a gorgeous view of Upper Manhattan and nearby Hoboken. Another awesome aspect of Le Bain is its ties to the art and culture world. Since its opening many organizations have held events and openings here. A recent one was Ryan McGinness debuting his work “Woman: The Blacklight Paintings” during the Armory Show in March. As I have preached before public art spaces don’t just have to be the run-of-the-mill sculptures but they can be spaces as well. So when I went out last Thursday at Le Bain the DJ had a violinist come up and join her for part of her set. The entire place was dancing and watching to it and I couldn’t help but record. Enjoy the Robyn and Yelle covers!

withoutwallsproject:

First off I’d like to take the time to take some time out to say hello to all of the new followers! I take it you guy like what you’re seeing and are looking forward to more. Also if you joined from SoundCloud thanks again, I got over 100 followers overnight so it’s a pretty awesome accomplishment. I’ll be posting a personal recording thanking everyone on my SoundCloud page very soon. So let’s get on with today’s recording!

Today I’m taking you guys to the East Village. Located just south of 14th St, this neighborhood is known for its relatively cheap eats, St. Mark’s, and the abundance of NYU students (myself included) that run around at night. This recording is also a double header of sorts. It features the “Alamo”, a black cube in the middle of Astor Place which can be spun on its axis. It’s a bit of ritual to push the cube once you’ve moved to New York. Originally installed in 1967 the sculpture was meant to be temporary but residents of the area petitioned for it to become a permanent fixture. The second artwork is a temporary piece commissioned by the city itself. A couple of lampposts throughout the East Village have been tagged with fluorescent cables by the Animus Art Collective. Commissioned by the Department of Transportation it is being used as markers for the city’s fourth annual “Summer Streets” program.

Finally, I have decided that I will be going to Philly, Boston, and Montreal to capture some sounds for the project. If any of you guys are from these cities I would love some tips on where to look for some cool street art as well as some submissions from you guys! Remember you can find all the information you need under the Participate page. That’s all for now, ciao!

withoutwallsproject:

Today’s find takes us to one of New York’s most iconic buildings, the Flatiron. Located on 23rd st between Broadway & 5th Ave the building was one of the first major skyscrapers to be erected in the city. At the base of the building there is vast retail space housing businesses like MAC Cosmetics and Sprint. Sprint has taken the great initiative to use part of their retail space as a sort of gallery showroom for new and emerging artists. Dubbed the “Flatiron Prow Artspace”, the company’s mission is to display artwork that  is “as unique and engaging as the building itself, with an emphasis on pieces that reflect the company’s commitment to eco-friendly living, technology and interaction”. The artwork that was on display was Miles Neidinger’s “Everything We See is Never Enough”. The massive structure models various synthetic materials such as twist ties, bright drinking straws, vinyl tape, and yarn and into seemingly organic shapes. In doing so the artist hopes the viewer strips away preconceived notions about synthetic materials and sees the materials in a “new found physical state”. In the sound recording you’ll hear the sounds of afternoon rush hour on the street: cars beeping, ambulance sirens, and people laughing as they clock out of work and into a happy hour nearby.

withoutwallsproject:

Happy Monday everyone! I am happy to report that I have gotten some user submissions and I will be featuring them this week. The first one comes from Jeff in Astoria, Queens (my home borough!) and it is set in Athens Square Park. The park was originally a playground which the city acquired in 1963. In 1990 a $1 million dollar reconstruction of the space, funded by the city, motivated the neighbors to make the playground a public park space for the community. A community group under the name ‘Athens Square, Inc.’ planned the reconstruction and decided on a design that resembled Athens itself. Why you ask? As many New Yorkers know, Astoria is predominantly a Greek community. The new park was to be comprised of three parts:

“a central court with amphitheater and sculpture, a recreational space, and a seating area along the perimeter. The group said its intention was to create “a little bit of Athens in Astoria.”

Through the 1990s, the group slowly built what is the Astoria Square Park we see today. Fun fact, one of the sculptures in the park is an actual gift from the mayor of Athens in 1998! The recording itself is from an Italian Festival that occurred in the park over the weekend. I hope this cover of Cascada’s “Every Time We Touch” will bring a smile to your face on the start of your work week. I know I smiled and maybe giggled a little.

withoutwallsproject:

The power behind art is undeniable. When you’re in a museum there’s that specific painting that just makes you drop everything and just look. When you’re on the street there’s always that one piece of street art that makes you stop and think, even if its for 30 seconds. Art also has the power to heal and communicate a powerful story. Today’s recording is another user submission, Peter Snelling from the UK. Peter is a producer who’s mission is to give voices to those that usually go unheard. He does this through various art and creative projects, one of them being the “Hopes and Fear Project”. In the project teenagers talk about what their hopes and fears are striking some funny, powerful, and inspiring stories. At the end of the project the teenagers went on to create print art work and exhibited to their community at the Exeter Pheonix. Their stories were also told over the radio Phonic FM. The recording featured today is from a young girl Bea, who battled leukemia. Powerful story but one that should be heard. I would like to thank the users that have submitted material thus far in the project and would like to remind all of you, you can submit material as well. Just click on the Participate page to get all of the details!

withoutwallsproject:

Photo Credit: Freshnessmag.com

Happy Labor Day! As many of you take in the unofficial end of summer (and a long weekend) I present to you a new find. This find is by the famed Shephard Fairey and can be found on Bowery & East 5th St. If you don’t recognize the name, you probably have seen his work. Among having murals in almost every corner of the world, he also designed the Obama “Hope” poster that went viral during the 2008 presidential election. In addition his work can be seen in some of the most prolific museums in the world such as the MoMA, the Smithsonian, and the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. The particular mural on the side of the Cooper Square Hotel is part of the hotel’s Art Wall Project. The mural depict a Myanmar Buddhist monk with an umbrella - a surprisingly politically charged subject. In 2007 these monks began to be prosecuted by the government because of their peaceful protests against the rulers. The mural serves as a voice for those being oppressed in Myanmar as well as a reminder of the price of freedom of speech. The sounds captured around the mural are fairly representative of the Bowery: loud traffic and chatty New Yorkers.

withoutwallsproject:

Hello, fellow followers and thanks for coming onto the blog for this announcement. So as you know I’ve been traveling through New York looking for public art spaces - no matter how small or large. Well, I’m happy to announce that I’m taking my one-man scavenger hunt on the road! I will be visiting a couple of cities in the following weeks to document what those cities have to offer in terms of public art spaces. So what cities will I be going to? Well, I think it’ll be fun to keep you guys guessing every week but I’ll announce the city I’ll be going to next week….. Montreal!

That’s right! I’ll be crossing the border and in francophone land for some art fun. So, why am I choosing this city particularly? Well a couple of reasons. One important one, I have friends in the city so traveling there won’t be too expensive. I am a recent grad with no job so gotta cut costs where you can! Another important reason is Montreal’s extensive documentation of all of the official public art work the city possesses - over 200 to be exact. From the research I have gathered Montreal ALSO has a pretty vibrant street art community which of course is big component of the project. Plus, I think it would be pretty awesome to capture some candid moments in French Canadian, don’t you think? Of course I’ll need some help from you guys in terms of tips! If you guys have any awesome recommendations for public art to see in the city - send it my way (eduardo.i.lipe@gmail.com)! I hope you guys are excited as I am to take this journey on!

YAY EDDIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

withoutwallsproject:

Now I’m really excited about the sound I’ll be featuring today. The recording was done in Montreal’s “Quartier des Spectacles” specifically by the water fountains in front of the Contemporary Art Museum. The “Quartier des Spectacles” is an initiative by the city and fellow partners to liven up the downtown area through the use of visual culture. By putting up several art installations, public concerts, and more the city hopes that this initiative gives Montreal a unique identity that will keep residents and tourists coming back for more. I find this recording to be a particular stand out for multiple reasons. First I love how Montrealers and tourists interacted with the space. Some sat and read a book, or like myself, enjoyed a mid afternoon snack. Others - like the students in the beginning of the recording - were more active with the fountains playing around and using it to their pleasure. Now you’ll notice that there seem to be two different takes in the same area. Well I came back to the site at the end of my day to take a breath and noticed that all of the fountains were working! When I was there earlier in the day, it was just the main one. As the entire set started up a water show I noticed that the sounds of the water splashing had a bit of a tempo to it! I also love the different languages you hear in the recording, particularly the Canadian French and Spanish at the beginning. If you want to find out more about the Quartier read their mission statement here!