small girl. big city. cliches abound.

STL Native. NYU and Columbia Alum. Ain't nothing about this blog consistent. I like what I like.
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ntcreativenough4this:

feministblackboard:

Did you know that Hattie McDaniel was the first African American woman to ever be nominated for an Academy award?She was not even allowed to attend her own movie’s premiere. The movie, in case you are unfamiliar, was 1939’s Gone with the Wind. Her career began with radio in which she played a maid who went by “Hi-Hat Hattie.” The radio serial was called “The Optimistic Do-nut Hour.” She was paid so little for her role (especially in proportion to her white counterparts) that she had to work as a real maid off to the side in order to make enough money to live. She also got criticism from different groups such as the NAACP, who felt she, like other black actors at the time, were only perpetuating stereotypes of African Americans. She decidedly kept working as she did saying, “I’d rather play a maid for $700 a week than be one for $7.”

dropping knowledge! 

ntcreativenough4this:

feministblackboard:

Did you know that Hattie McDaniel was the first African American woman to ever be nominated for an Academy award?

She was not even allowed to attend her own movie’s premiere. The movie, in case you are unfamiliar, was 1939’s Gone with the Wind.

Her career began with radio in which she played a maid who went by “Hi-Hat Hattie.” The radio serial was called “The Optimistic Do-nut Hour.” She was paid so little for her role (especially in proportion to her white counterparts) that she had to work as a real maid off to the side in order to make enough money to live.

She also got criticism from different groups such as the NAACP, who felt she, like other black actors at the time, were only perpetuating stereotypes of African Americans. She decidedly kept working as she did saying, “I’d rather play a maid for $700 a week than be one for $7.”

dropping knowledge! 

(Source: feminist-blackboard)

karnythia:

BrotherMen: Something To Think About

peecharrific:

brothermen:

Black America, we really need to get on the same page about a lot of things.

For example, we can’t be all that upset about the Troy Davis verdict and still be pissed every time you hear a Chris Brown song.

What Chris Brown did was wrong, true. But he paid his dues, did his penance for what…

did brothermen really just tie chris brown to troy davis?

sit the entire fuck down please. and normally i really like this blog.

I need someone to come get their cousin. Right now. RIGHT MOTHERFUCKING NOW! Are we really trying to equate being murdered for a crime no one is sure you committed with community service & lower album sales for a crime you did commit? Really? 

I can’t……….

For those not following the Melissa Harris-Perry race debacle here’s a little summary….

notime4yourshit:

MHP theorizes about how race effects Obama’s Presidency

Gene Lyons accuses MHP of “whining, compares her to Michele Bachmann & says PhD’s are trained to find racist symbols in passing clouds

Joan Walsh gets into the act 

As does David Sirota

As does Taylor Marsh

Angry Black Lady rebukes Gene Lyons critique of MHP

As does Elon James White

As does Radically Queer

As does The Reid Report

As does Tiger Beatdown

As does Bob Cesca

As does Graceishuman

As does Feministing

As does Racialicious

As does EJ Graff

MHP responds to criticisms of her criticisms

Gene Lyons can go eat a bag of expired, sour dicks and also!

sourcedumal:

ladysugatits:

kwllkid:

i think black people are the only people keeping racism alive because of constantly blaming their skin color for everything bad happening to them… smh

Photobucket

(Source: illmaticdivad)

The “Other” 99 Percent…

hamburgerjack:

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

thehuskybro:

Dave Chappelle summin’ shit up oh so succinctly

Goodness, I say this on a daily basis…

Welp………….there’s that………….*picks afro*

More on Black Americanness

lebanesepoppyseed:

zorascreation:

We get shat on by everyone. Whites, non-Black POC and non-Black American Blacks. Treated like impositions for breathing. 

For no fucking reason. For shit that isn’t even our fault.

The folks hating us won’t even dare to study our real history, they’ll just consume the watered down public school bullshit and then grow up with folks telling them we are some uneducated degenerate godawful immoral sin-cult. And then believe it. Fuck allat.

But these same anti-Black Americaners will be quick to use our lingo, co-opt our experiences and our culture in a heartbeat.

Truth. As an African-descendant person who isn’t African American, I always saw Afro-Latinos and Latinos in general go about shitting on African Americans yet it’s all cool when it’s time to use the N word or listen to hip hop and act like a “thug”, some fucking bullshit. Fuck that noise, you’re either with them or you’re not, you can’t shit on the people then steal from them. Go the fuck away.

If you use the term “African American” I probably hate you.

sourcedumal:

stfuandlistenwhitepeople:

jillian-marie:

Seriously. I probably think you’re a fucking moron and hate you for it.

Why would you hate someone for using that term? Like, seriously. I’m completely dumbfounded as to why you would dislike it.

LOL @ this white bitch telling AFRICAN AMERICAN folks what to call themselves. I call myself African American all day every day. WHO THE FUCK GON CHECK ME BITCH?

And yo triflin ass got the nerve to tag this “colored??”

As much as I don’t like the term African-American for myself, I would never in my right mind tell somebody how the fuck they can identify, AND I’M BLACK (and I personally prefer Black or Black American, but again, that’s for me)!!!! The fuck you think this is? White lady, relax. 

unapproachableblackchicks:

:)

I love this friendship so much!!

unapproachableblackchicks:

:)

I love this friendship so much!!

sociofreak:

telafrictv:

African versus African American

“African versus African American” is a controversial and hard-hitting human interest documentary that addresses the little known tension that exists between Africans and African Americans. The documentary opens with an honest look at how Africans and African Americans view each other, then looks back at our shared history to seek out the genesis of these misconceptions. By weaving in the wisdom of our elders, brothers and sisters we want to build the bridges of understanding, reconciliation and homecoming.


Our hope is that this documentary stirs up the hearts and minds of the children of the African Diaspora, inspiring them to look at their roots and dare to understand each other better. But the core lesson of this documentary is universal making it a powerful tool for people who find themselves on opposite sides of history. We hope that it inspires us all to shake off the perceptions we have of each other that are based on fear and ignorance and start building bridges of understanding across racial, gender, tribal and religious lines.

im looking forward to this, although things like this always make me feel a certain way

Welp…………..this could get interesting.