small girl. big city. cliches abound.

STL Native. NYU and Columbia Alum. Ain't nothing about this blog consistent. I like what I like.
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annnoire:

Ida B. Wells
Ida B. Wells emerged in the 1890s as the leading voice against the lynching of African Americans following the violent lynching of three of her friends.  Beginning with an editorial in newspaper she owned, Memphis Free Speech in 1892 shortly after their deaths, she organized an international campaign that lead to two speaking tours in England in 1893 and 1894. The speech she gave on the subject at Boston’s Tremont Temple on February 13, 1893 and which was originally published in Our Day magazine in May 1893, appears below.
Source

This is the same lady who found the dude who was slandering her name and made him apologize, regardless of the fact that she was not a well liked person and the Klan was looking for her. Yeah…..spirit animal all up and through this bitch!!!!

annnoire:

Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells emerged in the 1890s as the leading voice against the lynching of African Americans following the violent lynching of three of her friends.  Beginning with an editorial in newspaper she owned, Memphis Free Speech in 1892 shortly after their deaths, she organized an international campaign that lead to two speaking tours in England in 1893 and 1894. The speech she gave on the subject at Boston’s Tremont Temple on February 13, 1893 and which was originally published in Our Day magazine in May 1893, appears below.

Source

This is the same lady who found the dude who was slandering her name and made him apologize, regardless of the fact that she was not a well liked person and the Klan was looking for her. Yeah…..spirit animal all up and through this bitch!!!!

Police are not racist, I’m white and I can promise you police would shoot my ass too. A lawyer who is white in my town aimed a gun at police and then he died. Don’t hate white people. White people brought civilization to this world. NAme a country that is black run that can perform open heart surgery, a liver transplant….is not poor, is not dangerous. Do it! You have it made here but I promise the latinos and asians entering this country are not going to treat you as nicely as we have.

In response to Chicago Police shooting a 13 year old black boy 8 times.

but wait.. did this person actually say “White people brought civilization to this world“…lol logs off (via alookintomymind)

yes he/she did and that is what gave me pause.

(via eclecticalexandria)

This must be a joke

(via theafrosistuh)

Dr. Daniel Hale Williams was an African American physician who made history by performing the first successful open heart surgery operation.

(via howtobenoladarling)

I’m glad someone posted the doctor Williams fact, people seem to forget that if not for imported slave labor this country the people that are still rich who became rich through industries that benefited from cotton production, those huge carrier cargo ships that brought slaves here, and all that slave labor that slaves, stolen Africans stripped from their home continent didn’t get paid for this country was built and founded on free labor thanks to my ancestors, then how about after slaves were emancipated they were still treated like shit, they were hunted like dogs, treated less than because of the color of their skin, and lets not forget Jim Crow laws, lynch parties, millions of black men’s genitals cut off and their bodies burned with no repercussions because they weren’t seen as human but instead as a threat to a white man and his family, separate but equal, Emmit till, need I go on? Civilized my ass everywhere a Caucasians has stepped foot on the planet in the name of civilizing something they have wrecked it, gave it diseased, killed it to extinction, ravished its culture, looted its resources, and wiped out its existence then wrote history in their favor so miss me with that civilized shit because when their ancestors were still in caves eating raw meat Africans were kings and Queens, doing math, pioneering in science, and had lavish beautiful civilizations look it up know your real history!

(via changelikewind)

Sure not all cops are racist..just most of the white ones.

(via masteradept)

(Source: rollingout.com)

ntcreativenough4this:

feministblackboard:

Did you know that Hattie McDaniel was the first African American woman to ever be nominated for an Academy award?She was not even allowed to attend her own movie’s premiere. The movie, in case you are unfamiliar, was 1939’s Gone with the Wind. Her career began with radio in which she played a maid who went by “Hi-Hat Hattie.” The radio serial was called “The Optimistic Do-nut Hour.” She was paid so little for her role (especially in proportion to her white counterparts) that she had to work as a real maid off to the side in order to make enough money to live. She also got criticism from different groups such as the NAACP, who felt she, like other black actors at the time, were only perpetuating stereotypes of African Americans. She decidedly kept working as she did saying, “I’d rather play a maid for $700 a week than be one for $7.”

dropping knowledge! 

ntcreativenough4this:

feministblackboard:

Did you know that Hattie McDaniel was the first African American woman to ever be nominated for an Academy award?

She was not even allowed to attend her own movie’s premiere. The movie, in case you are unfamiliar, was 1939’s Gone with the Wind.

Her career began with radio in which she played a maid who went by “Hi-Hat Hattie.” The radio serial was called “The Optimistic Do-nut Hour.” She was paid so little for her role (especially in proportion to her white counterparts) that she had to work as a real maid off to the side in order to make enough money to live.

She also got criticism from different groups such as the NAACP, who felt she, like other black actors at the time, were only perpetuating stereotypes of African Americans. She decidedly kept working as she did saying, “I’d rather play a maid for $700 a week than be one for $7.”

dropping knowledge! 

(Source: feminist-blackboard)

velocicrafter:

ishhara: feminally:
by Bryan Farrell | January 14, 2010, 3:42 pm
Every Wednesday since 1992, a group of South Korean former World War II sex slaves and their supporters gather outside the Japanese embassy in Seoul to demand compensation and an official apology from Japan, which ran a system of military brothels before its surrender in 1945. At yesterday’s gathering, many people carried signs with the number 900, signifying the landmark number of protests these so-called “comfort women” and their supporters have staged over the last 17 years.

Nora Okja Keller’s Comfort Woman weaves the accounts of a comfort woman and the diasporic struggles of Asian women with supernatural elements so, so beautifully.
Definitely one of the best books to be assigned to read in university. 

velocicrafter:

ishharafeminally:

by Bryan Farrell | January 14, 2010, 3:42 pm

Every Wednesday since 1992, a group of South Korean former World War II sex slaves and their supporters gather outside the Japanese embassy in Seoul to demand compensation and an official apology from Japan, which ran a system of military brothels before its surrender in 1945. At yesterday’s gathering, many people carried signs with the number 900, signifying the landmark number of protests these so-called “comfort women” and their supporters have staged over the last 17 years.

Nora Okja Keller’s Comfort Woman weaves the accounts of a comfort woman and the diasporic struggles of Asian women with supernatural elements so, so beautifully.

Definitely one of the best books to be assigned to read in university. 

afrocana:

 
ON THIS DAY
On Sept. 15, 1963, four black girls were killed when a bomb went off during Sunday services at a Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama, in the deadliest act of the civil rights era.
(via NYTimes)

afrocana:

ON THIS DAY

On Sept. 15, 1963, four black girls were killed when a bomb went off during Sunday services at a Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama, in the deadliest act of the civil rights era.

(via NYTimes)

ataxiwardance:

Five Things You Should Know About Fred Shuttlesworth
When legendary civil rights activist Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth died today, many Americans had no idea who he was or what he’d accomplished in his 89 years on earth. It’s an unfortunate reality that people often think Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X were the beginning and end of black activism in the Civil Rights era. In fact, nothing could be more wrong. From the 1950s onward, Shuttlesworth was a major factor in ending Jim Crow laws in the South, and many other oppressive forces throughout the United States. Here are the top five things you should know about him.
1. From the start of his career, Shuttlesworth, who was raised poor in Alabama, was fiery and obstinate. After Alabama officially banned the NAACP from operating within the state in 1956, Shuttlesworth, then a pastor, founded the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights. The ACMHR’s first major order of business was a Birmingham bus sit-in, during which Shuttlesworth and others boarded city buses and sat in the “whites only” sections. The ACMHR would eventually become charter member organization in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
2. He lived nearly nine decades, but many people tried to kill Shuttlesworth much earlier for his outspokenness. He was the target of two bomb attacks, one on his home and one on his church. And when Shuttlesworth tried to enroll his daughters in an all-white Birmingham school in 1957, an armed mob attacked him, beating him unconscious and stabbing his wife. The couple survived, and when a doctor remarked that Shuttlesworth was lucky to have avoided a concussion,Shuttlesworth said, “Doctor, the Lord knew I lived in a hard town, so he gave me a hard head.”
3. Though he worked closely with King, Shuttlesworth’s style was decidedly different. “Among the youthful ‘elders’ of the movement,” historian Diane McWhorter told The New York Times, “he was Martin Luther King’s most effective and insistent foil: blunt where King was soothing, driven where King was leisurely, and most important, confrontational where King was conciliatory—meaning, critically, that he was more upsetting than King in the eyes of the white public.” Despite their differences, King once called Shuttlesworth ”the most courageous civil rights fighter in the South.”
4. Shuttlesworth’s fiercest enemy in Birmingham was infamous public safety commissioner Bull Connor. Connor’s violent responses—attack dogs, fire hoses, billy clubs—to Shuttlesworth’s peaceful demonstrations were integral in changing America’s attitude about Jim Crow. “The televised images of Connor directing handlers of police dogs to attack unarmed demonstrators and firefighters’ using hoses to knock down children had a profound effect on American citizens’ view of the civil rights struggle,” says the Shuttlesworth Foundation’s website.
5. After his actions helped spawn the passage of the federal Civil Rights Act in 1964, Shuttlesworth continued fighting for justice in realms both racial and economic. In 1988 he founded the Shuttlesworth Housing Foundation to help low-income families own their own homes, and in 2004 he became president of the SCLC. A firebrand to the end, he resigned from the SCLC within months, saying “deceit, mistrust and a lack of spiritual discipline and truth have eaten at the core of this once-hallowed organization.” Three years ago, the city of Birmingham named its airport after Shuttlesworth. There are still no monuments named after Bull Connor.

ataxiwardance:

Five Things You Should Know About Fred Shuttlesworth

When legendary civil rights activist Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth died today, many Americans had no idea who he was or what he’d accomplished in his 89 years on earth. It’s an unfortunate reality that people often think Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X were the beginning and end of black activism in the Civil Rights era. In fact, nothing could be more wrong. From the 1950s onward, Shuttlesworth was a major factor in ending Jim Crow laws in the South, and many other oppressive forces throughout the United States. Here are the top five things you should know about him.

1. From the start of his career, Shuttlesworth, who was raised poor in Alabama, was fiery and obstinate. After Alabama officially banned the NAACP from operating within the state in 1956, Shuttlesworth, then a pastor, founded the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights. The ACMHR’s first major order of business was a Birmingham bus sit-in, during which Shuttlesworth and others boarded city buses and sat in the “whites only” sections. The ACMHR would eventually become charter member organization in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

2. He lived nearly nine decades, but many people tried to kill Shuttlesworth much earlier for his outspokenness. He was the target of two bomb attacks, one on his home and one on his church. And when Shuttlesworth tried to enroll his daughters in an all-white Birmingham school in 1957, an armed mob attacked him, beating him unconscious and stabbing his wife. The couple survived, and when a doctor remarked that Shuttlesworth was lucky to have avoided a concussion,Shuttlesworth said, “Doctor, the Lord knew I lived in a hard town, so he gave me a hard head.”

3. Though he worked closely with King, Shuttlesworth’s style was decidedly different. “Among the youthful ‘elders’ of the movement,” historian Diane McWhorter told The New York Times, “he was Martin Luther King’s most effective and insistent foil: blunt where King was soothing, driven where King was leisurely, and most important, confrontational where King was conciliatory—meaning, critically, that he was more upsetting than King in the eyes of the white public.” Despite their differences, King once called Shuttlesworth ”the most courageous civil rights fighter in the South.”

4. Shuttlesworth’s fiercest enemy in Birmingham was infamous public safety commissioner Bull Connor. Connor’s violent responses—attack dogs, fire hoses, billy clubs—to Shuttlesworth’s peaceful demonstrations were integral in changing America’s attitude about Jim Crow. “The televised images of Connor directing handlers of police dogs to attack unarmed demonstrators and firefighters’ using hoses to knock down children had a profound effect on American citizens’ view of the civil rights struggle,” says the Shuttlesworth Foundation’s website.

5. After his actions helped spawn the passage of the federal Civil Rights Act in 1964, Shuttlesworth continued fighting for justice in realms both racial and economic. In 1988 he founded the Shuttlesworth Housing Foundation to help low-income families own their own homes, and in 2004 he became president of the SCLC. A firebrand to the end, he resigned from the SCLC within months, saying “deceit, mistrust and a lack of spiritual discipline and truth have eaten at the core of this once-hallowed organization.” Three years ago, the city of Birmingham named its airport after Shuttlesworth. There are still no monuments named after Bull Connor.

African American women’s internal life experiences are part of the American story.
Melissa Harris-Perry on The Colbert Report, 1/9/12 (via educationforliberation)
becauseofthiswoman:

Name: Celia CruzDates: 1925-2003Why she rocks: She was one of the most successful salsa performers of all time, and earned 23 gold albums. She was known as “The Queen of Salsa” and “La Guarachera de Cuba”. 
Quote: “If I had a chance I wouldn’t have been singing and dancing, I would be a teacher just like my dad wanted me to be”Because of this woman… Cuban music became popularized around the world. 

becauseofthiswoman:

Name: Celia Cruz
Dates: 1925-2003

Why she rocks: She was one of the most successful salsa performers of all time, and earned 23 gold albums. She was known as “The Queen of Salsa” and “La Guarachera de Cuba”. 

Quote: “If I had a chance I wouldn’t have been singing and dancing, I would be a teacher just like my dad wanted me to be”

Because of this woman… Cuban music became popularized around the world. 

deliciouskaek:

dreams-from-my-father:

brombie:

aeropig:

26th of January isAustralia DayInvasion Day
Without forgetting the past, here is to a better future together.

together? how about I kill all my people off and then kill myself? HERES TO A BETTER FUTURE, YEAHHH

White people are the worst thing that ever happened to humanity SMH!

“without forgetting the past, let’s just forget the past and focus on people like me!”
*waiting for someone to tell me this is beautiful too*

Hey now. Let’s look past the chains and the fucked up-ness of the situation and concentrate on the fact that they have lovely natural hair and that makes them beautiful, alright. This helps fight against the mainstream push for straight and more manageable hair! /snark
Shoot me in the face.

deliciouskaek:

dreams-from-my-father:

brombie:

aeropig:

26th of January isAustralia DayInvasion Day

Without forgetting the past, here is to a better future together.

together? how about I kill all my people off and then kill myself? HERES TO A BETTER FUTURE, YEAHHH

White people are the worst thing that ever happened to humanity SMH!

“without forgetting the past, let’s just forget the past and focus on people like me!”

*waiting for someone to tell me this is beautiful too*

Hey now. Let’s look past the chains and the fucked up-ness of the situation and concentrate on the fact that they have lovely natural hair and that makes them beautiful, alright. This helps fight against the mainstream push for straight and more manageable hair! /snark

Shoot me in the face.

(Source: jojazm)

downlo:

1. You know that I didn’t write the article, right? The post is quoting a Slate article, which is quoting a number of linguists and studies about the phenomenon, which are linked in the bits I excerpted.

2. I’ve heard a version of your explanation before, but it’s not the whole explanation. As the article points out, there ARE some singers who sound more British, like Billie Joe Armstrong. Now how does he manage to do that? Well, he’s pronouncing his vowels differently and dropping his rhotic r’s. I’m just summarizing the article here, which you clearly didn’t read very carefully. There’s nothing about singing vowels that necessitates British singers to sound American. Many don’t. If there’s nothing technical that’s forcing Brits to sound American when they sing, then it stands to reason that many choose to sing in a particular way.

Also, the explanation as you give it doesn’t make a lick of sense.Why would singing long vowels “[make] you revert to using the true vowel sounds”? How are true vowel sounds only long vowel sounds? Does that mean short vowel sounds are fake vowel sounds? Also, I detect more than a whiff of Anglocentrism in your suggestion that “true vowel sounds”…are actually closer to British”. That sounds like you’re suggesting that only the British pronounce long vowels correctly. I’m not a linguist, but that smells like the true nationalist bullshit here. I mean, “British” is kind of broad, yeah? Are you suggesting that someone with a Northern accent pronounces her vowels exactly the way the Queen of England does?

So I’m not at all convinced by your groundless assertion that Americans “theoretically…sing like the British”.

3. It’s not “ethnocentric” for anyone to point out that many modern pop singers are consciously or unconsciously imitating an American dialect (or mish-mash of them). First, “American” isn’t an ethnicity. It’s a nationality. There are a lot of different ethnicities in this country. I’m guessing you meant ‘nationalist’ or something along those lines rather than “ethnocentric”. Figure out exactly what you’re accusing me of before you come at me, OK?

Second, as I said above, there’s peer-reviewed research by academics and linguists attesting to the American influences/roots of pop singing. I’m not just pulling this idea out of my butt. If you’re mad about the article’s claims, then take it up with the professionals quoted in the piece, not the blogger linking to it.

Third, this explanation for why English singers sound American makes sense given the history of pop music. No matter what some English people might assert—and I’ve heard some ridiculous ass attempts by them to downplay the American roots of their pop music—contemporary pop music began with black American music. White British and American kids listened to guys like Muddy Waters and Chuck Berry, thought they were cool, and ripped them off. Those white British kids sounded American when they sang because they were imitating the African American blues, R&B, and rock musicians they liked.

Black American music is the basis for modern R&B. Singers like Adele and Dusty Springfield are consciously or unconsciously imitating American R&B/soul/gospel/jazz singers like Etta James, Martha Reeves, and Aretha Franklin because that’s who they grew up listening to. Springfield, in particular, was so good at imitating black singers that some people who had never seen her in person assumed she was black. The Northern Soul movement, which might be pointed to as a ‘native’ influence/source for contemporary British pop singers to draw upon, was just English kids listening to obscure American soul records.

Sorry, white Anglos, but all the music you love was invented in America by black people. Jazz, blues, soul, R&B, hip-hop…African American music spawned pretty much the entirety of modern pop. Pointing out this fact is not ‘ethnocentric’ or ugly American chest-thumping. It’s being honest. It’s giving credit where credit is due. I won’t let people get away with suggesting that the music they love—including the way many contemporary pop singers pronounce their vowels—doesn’t owe nearly everything to African American culture.

Let me be clear: I’m not saying ALL pop singers sound American or Af-Am. Just that the reason why so many sound the way they do has to do with the origins of modern pop music in black American culture. Not all Brits sound American when they sing. Listen to ’70s English punk and ’80s post-punk bands like The Clash, The Sex Pistols, The Cure, Wire, etc. “God Save the Queen” has a lot of lines where Johnny Rotten stretches out his vowel sounds, but Johnny Rotten does not sound American. He sounds very British because of how he pronounces his vowels: “man” like “mahn” and “queen” (long vowel sound) like “quain”. Funny, but despite being British, the way he pronounces “queen” in that song definitely doesn’t sound like a “true vowel sound”. Unless ‘queen’ is supposed to sound like it kinda rhymes with ‘rain’.

Sorry for the mini-lesson in music history, everyone. I just don’t like it when people like aylathethespianlady come at me as though I don’t know WTF I’m talking about. It’s annoying to be accused of publishing things that I know aren’t true just to make myself feel better. And anyone who follows this blog knows that I’m not exactly a flag-waving nationalist.

I am also sick of white people glossing over or denying the black roots of modern pop music. This isn’t the first time some Anglo or Anglophile has come at me with a clearly bullshit version of history. I’ve actually had arguments with Brits who have tried to take credit for inventing rock ‘n’ roll!

(Made this post rebloggable by request)

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Sylvia del Villard!
Sylvia del Villard (February 28, 1928-February 28, 1990), was an actress, dancer, choreographer and Afro-Puerto Rican activist.
Del Villard was born in Santurce, a section of San Juan, Puerto Rico. As a young child, Del Villard would entertain her parents, Agustin and Marcoline Del Villard, with her dances. Her family considered her very talented and she was also a good student at school. She received her primary and secondary education in Santurce and when she graduated from high school the government of Puerto Rico awarded her with a scholarship to attend college.
Del Villard studied Sociology and Anthropology at Fisk University in Tennessee. However, Del Villard had to deal with the anti-black discrimination which was rampant in the southern regions of the United States at that time. She returned to Puerto Rico and enrolled in the University of Puerto Rico where she earned her degree.
Upon graduating, Del Villard traveled to New York City and enrolled in the City College of New York. It was during this period that she was to develop a passion and love for Africa. She joined the song and ballet group called the “Africa House”. She was also able to trace her African roots to the Yoruba people of Nigeria. Del Villard took dance and voice lessons with Leo Braun at the Metropolitan Opera.
Among the theater productions in which Del Villard has participated in Puerto Rico and abroad are: La Muerte (Death), La Tempestad (The Storm) and Let My People Go. She danced as a bailarina in the following American productions: Valley Without Echo, Witches of Salem, The Boyfriend, The Crucible and Kwamina. In Puerto Rico she joined the Afro-Boricua Ballet. With the ballet she participated in the following Afro-Puerto Rican productions, Palesiana y Aquelarre and Palesianisima.
In 1968, she founded the Afro-Boricua El Coqui Theater, which was recognized by the Panamerican Association of the New World Festival as the most important authority of Black Puerto Rican culture. The Theater group were given a contract which permitted them to present their act in other countries and in various universities in the United States.
Del Villard’s favorite poet was Luis Palés Matos. In 1970, she established a theater/school in San Juan and named it after him. However, it wasn’t long before she closed the theater because of the continuous complaints she received from her neighbors. Although many, including herself, felt the complaints were politically motivated and marked the beginning of a voluntary exile that eventually brought her to Hollywood, California.
She moved back to New York where she founded a new theater group which she named Sininke. She made many presentations in the Museum of Natural History in that city. In 1981, she became the first and only director of the office of the Afro-Puerto Rican affairs of the Puerto Rican Institute of Culture. She was known to be an outspoken activist who fought for the equal rights of the Black Puerto Rican artist.
In 1989 in California, Del Villard was diagnosed with lung cancer and returned to the island to receive treatment for her condition. Sylvia del Villard died on February 28, 1990 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
In 1993, Banco Popular de Puerto Rico produced a musical with the participation of many noted artists titled Ocho Puertas: Un Especial para la historia (Eight Doors: A Historical Special), which paid tribute to Del Villard among other artists. In the East Village of New York City, there is the Sylvia Del Villard Program of the Roberto Clemente Center, a Spanish day treatment program named after her. In Chicago, there is a Sylvia Del Villard Hall at the Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center.

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Sylvia del Villard!

Sylvia del Villard (February 28, 1928-February 28, 1990), was an actress, dancer, choreographer and Afro-Puerto Rican activist.

Del Villard was born in Santurce, a section of San Juan, Puerto Rico. As a young child, Del Villard would entertain her parents, Agustin and Marcoline Del Villard, with her dances. Her family considered her very talented and she was also a good student at school. She received her primary and secondary education in Santurce and when she graduated from high school the government of Puerto Rico awarded her with a scholarship to attend college.

Del Villard studied Sociology and Anthropology at Fisk University in Tennessee. However, Del Villard had to deal with the anti-black discrimination which was rampant in the southern regions of the United States at that time. She returned to Puerto Rico and enrolled in the University of Puerto Rico where she earned her degree.

Upon graduating, Del Villard traveled to New York City and enrolled in the City College of New York. It was during this period that she was to develop a passion and love for Africa. She joined the song and ballet group called the “Africa House”. She was also able to trace her African roots to the Yoruba people of Nigeria. Del Villard took dance and voice lessons with Leo Braun at the Metropolitan Opera.

Among the theater productions in which Del Villard has participated in Puerto Rico and abroad are: La Muerte (Death), La Tempestad (The Storm) and Let My People Go. She danced as a bailarina in the following American productions: Valley Without EchoWitches of SalemThe BoyfriendThe Crucible and Kwamina. In Puerto Rico she joined the Afro-Boricua Ballet. With the ballet she participated in the following Afro-Puerto Rican productions, Palesiana y Aquelarre and Palesianisima.

In 1968, she founded the Afro-Boricua El Coqui Theater, which was recognized by the Panamerican Association of the New World Festival as the most important authority of Black Puerto Rican culture. The Theater group were given a contract which permitted them to present their act in other countries and in various universities in the United States.

Del Villard’s favorite poet was Luis Palés Matos. In 1970, she established a theater/school in San Juan and named it after him. However, it wasn’t long before she closed the theater because of the continuous complaints she received from her neighbors. Although many, including herself, felt the complaints were politically motivated and marked the beginning of a voluntary exile that eventually brought her to Hollywood, California.

She moved back to New York where she founded a new theater group which she named Sininke. She made many presentations in the Museum of Natural History in that city. In 1981, she became the first and only director of the office of the Afro-Puerto Rican affairs of the Puerto Rican Institute of Culture. She was known to be an outspoken activist who fought for the equal rights of the Black Puerto Rican artist.

In 1989 in California, Del Villard was diagnosed with lung cancer and returned to the island to receive treatment for her condition. Sylvia del Villard died on February 28, 1990 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

In 1993, Banco Popular de Puerto Rico produced a musical with the participation of many noted artists titled Ocho Puertas: Un Especial para la historia (Eight Doors: A Historical Special), which paid tribute to Del Villard among other artists. In the East Village of New York City, there is the Sylvia Del Villard Program of the Roberto Clemente Center, a Spanish day treatment program named after her. In Chicago, there is a Sylvia Del Villard Hall at the Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center.

(Source: blacksupervillain)